Monday, November 3, 2008

I love the Sun Oven for....

Roasting fall vegetables! I am just addicted to it. I love the way that sweet potatoes, butternut squash, acorn squash, potatoes, and buttercup squash just end up so soft it's like they've been completely pureed within their own shells. I bet that garlic, pumpkins, and apples would end up the same way - they are on my list to try.

Here in Oklahoma City, the Global Sun Oven is still getting to 300 degrees F between 10 am and 3 pm. So it is a little harder to make dinner now, but great for roasting veggies that will then be used in a dinner recipe. You can also bake your brownies and pumpkin breads and other goodies around noon as well.

Two weekends ago, I roasted a butternut squash in the Sun Oven and made Butternut Quesadillas and Butternut Squash Squares. I've also used Sun Oven- roasted Butternuts for Stuffed Butternut and Butternut Bisque. I didn't even have to put the Bisque in the blender! You might wonder how to roast such a large vegetable as a butternut squash, since it's hard to find a container that both fits a BQ and fits inside the SO. I just place the butternut in a flat pan that fits in the Sun Oven, poke holes all over the squash, and drape a black cloth over the squash.

I've decided to stock up on Butternuts just in case there is a food supply disruption. I would like to have fresh veggies, regardless of my other stored food. Right now I only have 3 sitting on the countertop, but I'd like to get to 12 or so (one a week for 3 months).

I also plan to get a few ice chests to store potatoes and apples in the garage - but the weather is so weird here! This weekend the temperature reached 79 degrees. The produce would probably not like those temperatures, and I'm not yet up for digging the ice chests into the ground. But I think I will go for trying to store the produce in the garage anyway. You know, as an experiment :).

The roasted sweet potatoes from the Sun Oven generally go to my son. He is spoiled and won't eat the ones from the microwave. Those ones just aren't soft enough for his discerning 15-month old taste. They also make great Sweet Potato Quesadillas or Sweet Potato Pie.

Potatoes - so soft, it's like they are already mashed. (You do have to leave them in for quite a few hours to get them that way). Mashed potatoes, twice baked potatoes - easy!

So don't be discouraged by the shorter days. Solar cooking is actually perfect for cooking those seasonal fall and winter vegetables - you just have to cook them during the day, before you use them in your nightly recipes.

4 comments:

Chile said...

Roasting veggies in the solar oven is one of my favorite uses, too. My cut-off time, though, is now up to 2 pm due to the large trees in my neighbor's yard in just the wrong location! I'm working on being more organized early to get food out into the ovens...

vickycp said...

Do you always have to cover what you are cooking? I guess it doesn't have to be a tight fit if a cloth works...

How do cookies do in a SO? I found a grannyware cake pan and a cookie sheet that fits like a lid. I haven't tried cookies yet, though. I'm wondering if I would just loose all my heat when I baked different batches.
Thanks!
Thanks!

Hausfrau said...

Vickycp - I don't cover "baked goods" like banana bread, brownies, pizza, etc. The sun's heat absorbs better onto black, so I usually cover everything else, usually with a black lid on my pots and pans, but sometimes just by draping a black cloth over it.

Chile said...

Hausfrau, can I jump in here, too? When roasting sunflower or pumpkin seeds in the solar oven, I don't cover them because it would trap too much moisture in and they'd never get crunchy.