Thursday, June 24, 2010

Frau's Garden June 2010

The Deepwater Horizon event continues to depress me. However, since I can't seem to do anything about it aside from reduce my own dependency on oil, and continue building community / raising awareness, I'll just keep gardening...


The 13 tomato plants in my garden have made a startling comeback from the hail downpour last month and are setting fruit like crazy. This is good, because they typically shut down and stop producing during the heat of the summer - which is usually much of July and August. The exception is the smaller varieties like cherries and Juliets, which just keep going... and going....




Unfortunately, the tags for most of the tomato plants mysteriously erased themselves, leaving only blank white markers. So the plants that I raised from seed are currently incognito, although the five I bought from Horn Seed as insurance have been neatly labeled. However, most of the varieties are somewhat unique (Black Cherry, Carbon, Orange Banana) so I believe I will be able to identify them once I start harvesting. Since I hope to save seed this year, it will be important to know which plant is which.





My Burgundy variety okra are looking lovely. They are just toddlers here; eventually they will get to be eight feet tall and I will have to bend them halfway over to harvest them. I planted them between a butternut squash (which has two squash already) and an Orangeglo watermelon so the long vines could run in between the tall okra. Will this work out? Stay tuned....


Like the tomatoes, I may have gone a bit overboard with the okra. I planted eight or nine plants this year, because last year I didn't have enough to freeze and I missed their mucilagesnous-ness in my soups all winter. Fried okra is a Southern favorite, but I don't fry. Instead, I use the okra in soups and curries/Indian dishes. I hear a local chef also grills them whole, and since "you haven't had okra until you've had her grilled okra," I will just have to learn that method, too.







Here, a cantaloupe is flowering in a front yard crop circle near the echinacea. I hope no one runs over my cantaloupes - I will endeavor to keep them out of the driveway.





Right now, we are harvesting the end of the kohlrabi (a very underappreciatd vegetable), a daily handful of blackberries, and gearing up for the peach harvest. Because of the hail, it may not be a bumper crop. But mark my words, there WILL be peach jam.

2 comments:

Chile said...

Wow, your garden looks great! Another thing to try with the okra is eating them raw. The young ones are super-tender and lovely to snack on right off the plant. For larger ones, I often added them to couscous dishes - the couscous absorbed the mucilage and made them seem less slimy.

Sharlene T. said...

Okay, we were separated at birth...I adore kohlrabi and can't seem to find anyone else who enjoys them...what is wrong with people??!!?!?!...your vegetables look happy and you should get a great harvest...love okra, too, and can fry them, but discovered grilling a while back and it takes care of those moods...you'll love them, too, I know...come visit when you can... 8-)


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